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ROGER'S REAL

ALE RAMBLINGS

THE TRUE BREW TALES OF REAL ALES

Specifically, elevated levels of silicon in real ale reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, and Xanthohumol, a compound found in hops, reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. And did you know that real ale contains fewer calories than skimmed milk or orange juice?


As if those aren’t enough reasons to drink it, it’s also well known that the more you drink the wittier you are and the more attractive you become to the opposite sex."

"There is always a good range of ever changing guest real ales in the Stanhope and anyone curious to try them can always ask one of the friendly bar staff for a sample before ordering.


There are plenty of reasons why real ale is becoming very fashionable and a recent article in the Evening Standard highlighted the health benefits of drinking it.


According to health experts, ingredients in real ale help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and type

2 diabetes. Whooppee! Isn't that what we've all been waiting to hear.

Roger putting his pint point across regarding the benefits of being a real ale head...

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Roger is a regular at the famous Stanhope arms pub in Brasted, Kent, and a close friend of Oliver Reed during those halcyon days of the late 60's early 70's. He once wrestled with a huge python in a 'pyathalon' but the whole thing turned out to be a dream, during one of his famous lost weekend real ale drinking bouts. The same weekend, he fought off the ghost of Mario Lanza, had a few pints of Bathswaters best while pike fishing with Roger Daltrey, and he famously once wrestled a nude alligator, who then turned into Britney Spears.


He once did have a blood test, but as the contents were mainly deemed to

be Scotney Ale, he was allowed home early. Roger is a well respected writer, journalist, world traveller and philanthropist. He is an expert on the subject of Royal Ladies Corsets through the ages, and yet he is mainly famous for being the only small boy in the balcony scene in The Beatles 1964 film, 'A Hard Day's Night'.

"I wish I'd never been in that bloody scene" rues Roger. "it's hung round my neck like a millstone..I'd much rather have been in 'Mrs. Brown You've got a lovely Daughter' starring Hermans Hermits."